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to the soviet union because you and your expertise on the soviet union, how do you see russia developing over the next few years and do you think that their importance in the world will continue to increase perhaps even suppressing china? i think the russians are in trouble in terms of the global standing and i think they know it. the russian economy is 80% on the oil gas and minerals that isn't a modern economy and i will tell you a little story that shows how much the oil and gas and minerals are linked up with personal fortunes, political power and the state. i was at the australian foreign minister's house one day having a meeting about energy policy and he was going around asking people about the energy policy, and so the russians as well, you know, we understand that our oil and gas fields are technologically behind. but no foreigner will ever known russian olive oil and gas so we are going to buy the technology for the western oil companies. so i had been a director of the corporation and i said so don't you understand that there's advantages in their technology they aren't coming to s
, in talking about another country, russia. you know, russia desperately wants to reproduce itself to the rest of the world. and not in some of the main it has been. they get this opportunity with the g20 coming up in september. crystal ball, do you see anything from a coordination standpoint from the g20, and -- having out of this? this? and easy russia's image change? >> i think this is a big opportunity for the prime minister to show what could happen in russia. we will just have to see. because they're sitting on all these oil reserves. we know where the price of oil is. but there as you know there's a lot of problems. and so we have to see whether communist, russia can show that it's taking some of these reforms it needs to take. and we will see. and this is a perfect opportunity to do so. so far i think, as i said, the only g20 meeting that really did any thing positive was the one in london. and i give credit to gordon brown. that was his greatest moment i think at that particular time. do it. no, i mean come effect very organized meetings. i was in korea. there was no one who can organ
more members to draw closer to russia and even bring in as george bush did the former hud republics of the soviet union into this alliance and you wonder why the russians are upset about this and he lost his nerve on the things the country needed to do in terms of international agreements need to be a part of the accord and signed a comprehensive test ban treaty needed to be a part of the mines and the ban on the cluster bombs. we should have been a part of banning the use of teenagers in combat. over 100 nations have signed all of these pacts and if you look at the country that didn't, what we call the road nations in the united states saw them get to george bush and it's painful to talk about those eight years the fact that country reelected george bush doesn't say very much for any of us anywhere you boies edmondson use of intelligence on the war to a certain degree we certainly had it in the mexican war and the 1840's and the spanish-american war act. but in vietnam, the resolution was based on the misuse of intelligence. but you never had the systematic destruction of intellige
of the cold war and more members from russia, even as george bush did, the former republic of the soviet union. into this alliance and you wonder why the russians are upset about that. and then finally clinton lost his nerve on things of this country needed to do in terms of international agreements. we need to be part of this be part of this ban on cluster bombs. all of the nations have signed these packs. it is what they call the rogue nations, and then we have the united states. then we get to george bush, and it is possible to talk about those eight years. the fact that this country reelected him does not say very much for any of us anywhere. always had misuse of intelligence to a certain degree. the mexican war in the 1840s, the spanish-american war. in vietnam as well. that was based on the misuse of intelligence. but you never had systematic distortion of intelligence the way that you had in the run-up to the iraqi war. you've never had someone tell the president it would be a slamdunk not help you make up your mind. but to help you convince the american people that we need to undertake
for the united states trade on woodside and russia and the united states walked away but could we convince people that they need to be there? that is a question. >> host: but our footprint will be much smaller civic that is the choice beer making but it is a different kind of the print if you had colleges like the one that i went to or 10 of these spread throughout the tribal areas think of a future generation the direction of the nation we value education and the lot and a compassionate civil society not the fact with missiles and drones. so the paradigm can go maybe brought up if the debate begins so i hope we act as a catalyst. >> host: professor, how does the suny shi'ah issue that we have talked about the last 10 years play into this? >> it does a and it doesn't the last she a minority plays an important role in the army. it isn't out in the service but what suicide bombers and the taliban are doing with the extreme understanding of the suny they also target the shia. that is appalling and a complete breakdown no government can allow that but it happens. iran has a strong shi'ah power with i
members that include the united states, china, it includes russia. russia is really neither an economic or military superpower except in regards to its nuclear arsenal. and then we have friends and britain and here we have two very much medium powers that are not economic heavyweights, you still exert a great deal of forward and influence in world affairs. a large part of that as leverage they security council itself. we have no india, no brazil, no party from outside this kind of frozen group. and this is, i think, an enormous problem for the security council and one that there's probably no structural way to overcome. the reason why is pretty simple. if you say to any of the current members, why did she set on down, france and britain come you guys had to combine in a single european union fee. and then there's a lot of hemming and hauling it in the meantime, germany pops up and says pet, we are actually one of the world's great economic superpowers. we have no military to speak of and we cannot do anything, but we pay for everything, so we actually deserve a seat. she say we know how
or the power in the world so they include the united states, china, and includes russia but russia is neither an economic or military superpower accept in regards to its use nuclear arsenal. then we have france and britain, and here we have the median of powers that are not economic heavyweights in the world and yet still exert a great deal of force in the world affairs a great deal of influence on world affairs but a large part of that is actually a leveraged by the security council itself. we have no india, we have no prez sell -- brazil, no party outside of this kind of frozen grouper and this is i think again the enormous problem for the security council and no structural way to overcome. the reason why is pretty simple. why don't you step on down. there is a lot and in the meantime germany pops up and says we are one of the world's greatest economic superpowers and we can't do anything from the marshall standpoint but we pay for everything so we deserve a seat we dhaka the military either we should have a seat because we are an economic superpower and some very powerful country which say
in those components on that part. you know, just as an aside, in talking about another country, russia, you know, russia desperately wants to reintroduce its self to the rest of the world. and not in some of the way that it has been. they have this opportunity with a g20 coming of in september. crystal ball. do you see anything from a coordinations standpoint from veggie 20 coming out of this? you see russia's image changing? >> well, i think this is a bigger opportunity for the prime minister to show what could happen. we will just have to see. they're sitting and these are reserves. we know where the price of oil is, but there are a lot of problems. and so we have tessie weather, you know, russia can show that it is taking some of these reforms it needs to take. we will see, and this is a perfect opporunity to do so. so far, i think, as i said, the only g20 meeting that really did anything positive was the one in london, and i give credit to gordon brown, that was his greatest moment, i think, at that particular time. the i mean, you have had very well organized meetings. i was in korea.
your the conservative movement was still jelling. in the 1970s, russia's focus is on, it initially on the possibility of actually replacing the republican party with a new conservative party. i found a letter in which he said to a friend my problem, about 1975, my problem with the republican party isn't that it's not conservative enough. it's that it isn't big enough. again, he wanted to win. and republicans after watergate in the mid '70s were just in terrible shape. i won't recite the details but, you know, a lot of them probably felt they were back where they were back in the 1930s. not only minority part but a small minority part. russia wants to take this opportunity to start a new conservative party. not rigidly conservative but consciously conservative. one in which the liberal wing of the republican party would not be present and, therefore, would not have the veto power he thought they would have. he believed the key to this was one, not necessary the most important thing but an important thing, is to moderate economic conservatism a little bit and be a little more populis
of your performance that has created so much importance turmoil in russia and in the world. i realize the other day the one piece that you have done that is the most important is a strange and beautiful factor action supported a woman's right to pray. i have been reading about money and male power in how important men are on colin's and paper money sometimes to men but women are rarely on many some of the meaning is a represents the imperial prayer between father and son. that is governing, history, religion , ideology based on men's imperial prayer also uttered more publicly and privately and that power will be passed from father to son and everyone will with is that display and worship of all the powers of the power especially the church. bring you asserted in your letter to the patriarch the sincerity of your prayer i wondered for a moment if you were being ingenuous. but the more it thought about it after reading the court documents, i realize what prayer is and was and female prisoners are kept hidden so there will be no spectacle of female power in the world. all actions must be
, and that was a long, long time ago. the arsenals of the united states and russia are full of many, many nuclear weapons many, many, many times bigger than this. but this is a rough and ready nuke of the kind that it would not be hard for the iranians or the north koreans or pakistanis or others to design. and so what would happen if one of these things was popped off in downtown manhattan? well, the map shows certain assumptions about wind speed and other factors what the devastation would be, and, of course, it's worst around the ground zero, and it's slowly getting a little bit better as you go farther out. but the estimate in this scientific journal is that this relatively small nuclear device would jury about 1.6 million people and kill over 600 million people just from being -- 600,000 people. i think we need to think about these kinds of dangers because they are not going away, and as the iranian nuclear program accelerates, these are very real possibilities that we have to think very hard about. rome was brought down by barbarians. we have to be very careful that we ourselves are not bro
. frisk examines russia's involvement in the conservative movement and his relationship with "national review" founder william f. buckley. it's about an hour. >> thank you, john, and good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. there were two bills at "national review." and in the conservative movement. two bills. bill buckley, a brilliant shooting star lit up the sky, and bill rusher, and never wavering north star by which conservatives learned to chart their political course. now, many have written about william f. buckley, jr., that a resistible man, but no one until david frisk has given us an in depth portrait of the other bill, william rusher, who among his other contributions played a pivotal role in the life of the national draft goldwater committee, and that was critical. because if there had been no draft goldwater committee, there would have been no presidential candidate barry goldwater in 1964. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater you see who approved reagan's famous television addre
, the czar in russia who because they are there only through privilege and not confidence are really not very skilled in diplomacy and not very able to repent the outback of world war i. after that assassination you referred to. now iraq. a nonpartisan statement but i think it's said fairly that experienced foreign-policy and tended to listen arguably to people who wanted to precipitate the war. her hep c moved impetuously without appropriate evidence regarding wmd. that can be seen as leadership and later on the intelligence was proven not to have been there. here is the fun part. if you are trying to get these ideas and compare them to "lord of the rings" has its own decrepitude to talk about as well.
, considering the region. china on one side, india the south, russia to the north. united states can't just pack up and walk away. but are we able to convince the people there, our local hosts and potential allies, that we need to be there? that is the question. and that is where i believe there has been a failure. >> host: but we are -- our footprint is going to be much smaller after 2014. >> guest: that's a choice we're making and i'm not entirely happy. i would like a different kind of footprint. if you had conditionals like the one i went to, which is a university now, and they open -- if you had ten of these, throughout the tribal areas, think of the impact. think of the future generation, in one stroke you're changing the direction of a nation. if we value education, knowledge, law, a compassionate civil society, we must understand, peter so do the irans and pakistanis. we must try to convey this to them. not to suggest that soldiers and guns and missiles and drones because that will immediately have locals resisting. so the paradigm has to be thought out and that can only be thought out i
. when immigrants left the steppes of russia there with note delta flight, virgin air flight to see mom the next year. you were betting your last dollar that you might be able to get away from the oppressive left and reestablish your life in his new land. as you enter the harbor terrific moment, you had your first look at the new land and the fog is there, maybe the fog will clear and you will see the statue of liberty and those immigrants would see that, go by the statue of liberty and they would not know the pedestal being built with pennies and nickels, then they would turn and have the first look at the new york city skyline, the city that would welcome them, where they learn their english, where they get their first foothold on the american economic life and if the sun was right you be leaning off of the gold dome of the world building, not a monument to congress or banking or manufacturing or agriculture but a monument to the american press, the only constitutionally explicitly constitutionally protected business in the united states by the first amendment, doesn't say you have th
of the worst, germany and russia and poland during the 20th century, the chances of dying of a violent death, any of those are several times lower than dying a death in traditional society. it is that they are instruments in an modern society and government. the government declares war. when they declare peace, men are restrained from starting the war. traditional societies are at war almost constantly. the numbers show that the chances of dying a violent death is something like 10 times the chances 10 to 20 times the chance. that is a huge price to pay. >> gentleman to the right. >> we see in our own country in recent months to much pure evil, if you will. could you imagine any traditional saudi the mass killing of children? viewed in the traditional sense heidi, could it be prevented? >> not only can i imagine it, sadly it is actually common -- the killing of children in some cultures. because the women are going to give her and her children will grow up in this environment. >> what about the discriminate wonton killings. what about lebron we? can you talk about that? there seems to be at
threat that was going to happen in the biggest threat to america. to america. it used to be russia or the bomb or another country or china. the greatest threat to american security will simply be an individual or a small group who is determined to die for their cause. you don't have to evoke 9/11 to see what the damage will be or if you look at assassins they could be divided into categories. hunters and howlers. howlers make a lot of noise and they call it on threats and they intend to kill us but the good news is they rarely take action. the hunters are different. hunters clock, plan and execute but here's what fascinating. hunters have almost no interest in howling and howlers have almost no interest in hunting and if you look at the for assassins all four of them are hunters. that means the secret service who i have so much respect for further training facility in maryland it means the person they are looking for is the person who they will never see coming. that is a scary thought. along with assassins the funniest part of it is the guy who took me into this museum the guy who
don't see russia invading western europe i don't see it being a ground war war, president obama and panetta that the most attention was the pivot one thing that wasn't so well noted was the idea of nation-building that they show the size its forces for long scale operations which means no more iraq and afghanistan. when you do your scenarios and calculations the small stuff is the special forces. is setting up a special specialist and that is what the army is doing now. there is something in western california called the national training center with massive tank battles in iraq and afghanistan have direct did mock villages and they have exiles, somebody would be an insurgent and they play these useful and creative games but now it is called full spectrum operation at the national training center for the first time they fired artillery shells but also a humanitarian assistance and sings with the village so they train for everything and also the best way to cut money cheaply and quickly is by cutting manpower it would take five years to build the aircraft carrier in the first yea
to be russia or the bomb or china or whatever, and they figured out, ten and 20 years from now, the greatest threat to american security will be an individual or small group that is determined to die for their cause, and you don't have to invoke 9/11 to see what the damage can be. when you look at assassins they kinded into hunters and howlers, and howlers make a lot of noise and call in bomb threats and say they're going to kill us, but they rarely take action. the hunters are very different. hunters plot and plan and execute. but here's what is fascinating. hunters have almost no interest in howling, howlers have almost no interest in hunting, if you look at the four assassins, all for of them are hunters and that mean the seek vet service would who i have so much respect for, took me to their train facility in maryland. means the person they're looking for is the person who they'll never see coming. right? that's a scary thought. and along with assassins -- the funniest part of -- always the funniest part of the assist sin is the guy who took me into his museum, who has all the body parts
of the worst, germany, russia and poland, the chance of war or violent deaths are several times slower than most traditional societies that it's not that they're more vicious. it's more intermittent affair because the government declares war and the saudi government declares peace, hotheaded young men who want to start a war or restrained from starting, whereas traditional societies is a government that restrains potheads from going back to work. traditional societies are costly and the numbers show chances of dying a violent death in traditional societies that contains the chance is to mobile society. >> jemma mintier right there. >> we just see in our own country in recent months just to much pure evil if you will. could you imagine any traditional society en masse killing of children? the virtues of the traditional society prevent that. >> not only can i imagine that, sadly it's common. sadly it is common to killings of children and friends of mine said of course we will kill the women and of course will kill the children because they would give birth to worsen the children will grow up
. it used to be, like, russia, the bomb, whatever you want to name it, and what they figured out 10 and 20 years from now the greatest threat will simply be an individual or a small group who's determined to die for their cause, right? and you don't have to invoke 9/11 to see what the damage can be. but when you look at assassins, they can be divided into two categories; hunters and howlers. and howlers make a lot of noise, and they call in bomb threats and say they're going to kill us, but the good news is they rarely take action. hunters are very different. hunters plot, plan and execute. but here's what's fascinating is ha hunter -- that hunters have almost no interest in howling, and howlers have almost no interest in hunting. and if you look at the four assassins, all four of them are hunters. and that means the secret service, who i have so much respect for, they took me to their training facility out in maryland, it means that the person that they are looking for is the person who they'll never see coming, right? that's a scary thought. um, and along with asags sins -- assassins, yo
. in other words, part titian or of actual politics. russia place tremendous value on these people and he was always trying, you know, with some success to get the more philosophical conservatives, classic example is buckley himself to appreciate that sort of career and not sort of after. i'm sure what you'll find in the book is a good deal of back and forth between publisher rasher, also in-house political accounts are rusher had the full privileges by the way of speaking out on any issue, officially and unofficially, officially in the meetings they held which could be long and interesting. he had full privileges speaking out on any editorial issue, anything above the national review's political condition, tom, what's most important permissive patent editorial role, although he didn't have an official one and they listen to them. at times they got tired of listening to him. but remember if you read about pressure or if you want to for related question, remember this is another world to logically. and remain so until rusher retired at the end of 1988. his successor publisher said when he
. if you want to compare the worst of the worst, germany, russia and poland during during the 20th century, the chance of the dawning of lord or violent deaths in any of those countries during the 20th century are several times slower than the chance of dying a violent deaths in most traditional society. it's not that people in traditional societies are more vicious. it is were is instrumented in modern societies because the government declares war and peace in the government declares peace, hotheaded young men who want to start a war are restrained from starting the war was in traditional society, there isn't a government are restrained sarcasm going back to work in. traditional societies are most cosmically. modern societies intermittently in the number shows the chance of dying a violent death in traditional societies have been the 10 times the chance. that's been a big surprise. >> another question. yes, gentleman to your right they are. >> with attention for more, we see in our own country in recent months just to much pure evil if you will. could you imagine in a traditional society
a chapter on afghanistan and on china, i talk about russia. india. i talk about america's competitive position in the world, where we are, what the challenges are for us, but also the world. i talk about alliances. i talk about the need to reconnect with public service. i have always believed that there is no nobler profession than public service. we havety myished that -- diminished that over a generation in a sense how many politicians have you heard make fun of government employees or diminish many some way -- in some way or make offhanded comments about washington is the bane of our existence, nothing good happens in washington. only the good, smart people are in nebraska or california or ohio. [laughter] you say that for political advantage occasionally, but unfortunately, that has permeated a society of young people who have been conditioned in many ways. and i think of what we are going to need and what joseph nye first wrote about from harvard in 1990. and he was, joseph nye was before our foreign relations committee along with richard armitage, and they were co-chair of a com
we have information. if you want to compare the worst of the worst, germany, russia, and poland during 20th century. the chances of dying of war or violent death in any of those countries during the 20th century are several times lower than the chances of dying of violent death in most traditional societies, and the reason is that the people in traditional societies are more vicious but that war is an intimate affair in modern societies with governments because the governments declare war and eventually declares peace. when the government declares peace hot headed young men who want to start a war again are restrained from starting a war, whereas in traditional societies without a centralized government there is of a government that restrains the hot heads from going back to work. so the reality is the traditional societies among war almost constantly. modern societies only intermittently, and the numbers show that the chances of dying of violent death and traditional society is something like ten times the chance to attend best deterrent the chance. that has been a big surprise
. what lessons each of these teachers to my c-span2 to transform that they can take of russia's good american citizens. >> will, that's a very good question whether less disharmony different kinds of leaders didn't. nasa said the only openly confessed in latin won three of my 18 chapters are about ramoses' in latin. he in turn is a model who and dr. king and his latin panama standing in. i want to bother you not put a willing to go to the courthouse and then the. of different kinds of and latin will on its face him people today need to in heaven with people their agent relief is in serious in 1967. the race issue so great and what a the most adults supported had opposed an one hadn't been here talk and, most of them. these kids really years. the effective begin have consent for written with. never know whom maria testing the of the first chapter and been for the us but, often trying to figure. and begin with his first speech will all learn and some of these nurses minions committee because it and expect it to do anything hidden barry and the rest of the and you can hear his penchant
, this is something that people forget. when immigrants left steps of russia, there was no virgin air flight to go home and see her mother. you are betting your last dollar to you could reestablish your life in this new land. as you enter the harbor, it is a tragic moment. you're going to have your first look at the new land. maybe the fog will clear and you will see the statue of liberty. the immigrants wouldn't exactly know the bit the pedestal was built by the tenets and lower class people, but then they would take a look at the new york city skyline. the city where they would learn english and get a foothold on american economic life. and if this run was right, it would glean off the dome of the world holding. not a monument to banking or manufacturing or other professions, but an individual who understood the new york world and the ticket to understanding how to get ahead and learning english. the ticket to american politics are you that is the effect that joseph pulitzer had. he was a very difficult man to live with. he was sort of like the howard hughes of the 19th century. at the peak of h
, russia invading western europe. if there's a war with china, ir don't see it being a ground war, at least not with us involved. president obama and secretary panetta and the joint chiefs of staff in their strategy reviewne oftt a year ago which is the mot attention to that was the pivote from europe to the pacific, one thing in that review that wasn't so well noted was the idea that it's kind of an end of nation building. he said the army and marines shall not size its forces for large-scale, prolonged stability operations which translated to english is like no more iraqs and afghanistans. not just no more iraqs and afghanistans, but when you do your scenarios, when you crank your calculations to figure out how many troops you need, thiss is not even the kind of scenario that should enter into the calculation. and as you say, the small stuff is mainly special forces. some people, including john nogle, have proposed setting up a special advise and assist, you know, soldiers who would be specialists in being advisers to overseas armies. and i think that is what a lot of the army is doing no
and through my involvement with x5, i detoured back into hi path to my flight to space, and ended up in russia, training as a backup, and when i was there, i had no idea that i would get a chance tofully to space. i was just given an opportunity to go and train. and a lot of people may have said, well, why should i spend six months in the cold winter of moscow, and just go there for no apparent reason. and to me it was an opportunity to go spend time if with the astronauts and go to the same places the first person who went to space resided, and that whole history of the russian space program compelled me to go there. and being there gave me that opportunity to be at the right place at the right time. unfortunately for the primary crew member, northwestern who was suppose -- the person who was supposed to fliful he developed kidney stone which disqualified him from the flight. but fortunately for me, i was there to say, i'll take his seat! and that what i did. and this is another point i usually -- when i talk to students, which i do quite often, i try to tell them that if you have a passion,
and the brightest who are in leadership. it was old, decrepit owner asked like the kaiser, the czar in russia who because they are there only to privilege a no-confidence are not skilled in diplomacy, not able to prevent the outbreak of world war i after that assassination you refer to. now iraq, not a partisan statement, but it has been said fairly that george bush 43 was not an experienced foreign-policy president. he listened to people who really wanted to precipitate the war. perhaps it would impetuously without appropriate evidence regarding wmds. that can be seen as an experienced leadership and later on the intelligence was proven not to have been there. here's the fun part, if you're trying to get these ideas and compare them, the "lord of the rings" has its own to talk about assault. remember the leader of the free peoples? actually come he has no official position. other leaders won't listen to him. the two monarchs i have reference tab in one case, the more powerful of the two kingdoms, dinosaur has gone mad. he has been seduced and the leader row on has been we which, another wizard i
. the arsenals of the united states and russia are full of many weapons many times bigger than this. but this is a very rough and ready with a time that wouldn't be hard for the iranians or the north koreans are pakistanis or others to design so what would happen if one of these was popped off in downtown manhattan? the map shows with certain assumptions about other factors with the devastation would be and of course it's worse around ground zero and it's getting a little bit better as you go further out but the estimate in the scientific journal is that this relatively small nuclear device would injure about 1.6 million people and kill over 600,000 people just from being set off in lower manhattan and of course you would see similar devastation if one were to be set out in washington. i don't mean to alarm anybody here but i think we need to think about these kind of dangerous because they are not going away and knows the program accelerates and as pakistan destabilizes, these are possibilities we have to think very hard about. roma was brought down by barbarians. we have to be car
the treaties, such as russia and japan. it really is a u.s. instrument. so long with cannabis and opium, and became the main target of the 1961 convention. this historical error, it was basically justified by the 1950 report of the commission of inquiry on the coca leave, which as sanho tree pointed out, it's a total racist document. absolutely no scientific evidence and you can find on the web now and you will be outraged if he read it. yet it is still the basis for the international drug control conventions and treatment of that. subsequent to that, the who carried out a study of this and they concluded that the use of the week appears to have no negative health effects and has positive, therapeutic, and sacred functions for indigenous populations. there are a variety of other studies that points to the nutritional value. in response to the study, the u.s. government led the charge against an and it died and was never published, although you can find it on the internet. it also called for the elimination of coca chewing within 25 years. that period ran out in 1989. the international c
the highest rate of incarceration and the world with even highly repressive regimes like russia or china or iran but this cannot be explained by crime or crime rates. no. during the same period of time that our incarceration rates increased exponentially, crime rates fluctuate, went up, down, back up again, down again, and today as bad as they are in many parts of the country, nationally the crime rates are at historical lows. but incarceration rates at historic the sword. most criminologists and sociologists today will lead knowledge crime and acceleration rates in the united states have moved independently of one another. incarceration rates especially black incarceration rates have soared regardless whether the crime is going up or down in any given community or the nation as a whole. what explains the sudden explosion in incarcerations? the birth of the system unprecedented in world history sent crime and crime rates well the answer is the war on drugs and the get-tough move meant the way the putative mess that washed over the united states. drug convictions alone accounted for about
, they have key allies in the effort to maintain the treaties such as russia, japan, sweden. but it really is a u.s. instrument. so coca, along with cannabis and opium, became the main targets of the 1961 convention. this historical air as i like to call it, was basically justified by the 1950 reports of the commission of inquiry on the coca leaf, which as sanho pointed out is a totally racist document. it's totally, totally racist. has no scientific evidence. you can find on the web. you'll be outraged as you read it. yet it is to the basis for the international drug control conventions treatment of coca. subsequent to that in the 1990s, the u.n. world health organization carried out a study, w.h.o., carried out a study of coca and cocaine, and they concluded that the use of coca leaves appears to have no negative health effects and has positive therapeutic sacred and social functions for indigenous and indian population but there's a variety of other studies including one done by harvard that points to nutritional value of coca, of the coca leaf. but in response to the w.h.o. study, not
people forget. when immigrants but the steps of russia, there is no delta flight for virgin air flight. you bet the last dollars a night to litigate away from the oppression and reestablish her life and mr. lynn. as unit to the harbor, it's a terrific quality of your first look at the new land and its pakistani economy to the fog will clear and see the statue of liberty. you go right by the statue of liberty and it would of the pedestal had been built with pennies and nickels of the ones before them. the at the first look at the new york city skyline, where they learned there and push, get their first foothold on the american academic life and it would be cleaning up the code to the world building. not a monument to commerce, banking, manufacturing or agriculture, but a monument to the american press, the only constitutionally protect it for business in the 90s they doesn't say you have the right to make steel. the new york world will be the ticket to understanding how to get ahead. the ticket to understanding english and american politics. he was a very difficult man to live for as a
impact on me was the man from belgium, short, balding, born in russia three months before the russian revolution in 1917, and he discovered a new law of nature, law of dynamics, the physical law that says systems break down over time. think about a smoke ring. it starts as a coherent donut and then as the molecules separate and the energy dispates, it just breaks apart. everything is that way, and some -- some systems, it occurs quickly, and others it takes place over a longer period of time. he discovered what's the opposite of that. he studied open systems that have energy flowing into it and through it and out again, and what he fund was that when the flow of energy into an open system increases enough beyond a certain threshold, two things happen, the pattern of the system breaks down, but here's the surprising part, then the system reorganizes itself at a higher level of complexity. the whole feel of complexity, science came from that discovery, and the way we use the word "emergence," the phrase "emergent phenomena" really comes from that discovery so think for a minute about wh
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